Chinese New Year, Chinese Sweet Soup, Desserts, Festive Cooking, Malaysian/ Chinese Cuisine, Recipes, Tong Sui 糖水

Pengat Recipe

Do you know what is the dessert in the photo above?

How many of you guessed that it’s bubur cha cha? And how many of you think it’s pengat? The correct answer is PENGAT!

Well, some of you that are reading now may be confused and wondering what is the difference between a bubur cha cha and pengat. Allow me to do some explanation based on my personal knowledge.

Pengat originated from the Malay cuisine and it is traditionally cooked with coconut milk and gula melaka. There are many different types of pengat, such as pengat pisang (banana), pengat keladi (yam/ taro), pengat keledek (kumara/ sweet potato) and etc. The Malaysian Penang Nyonyas adopted this traditional Malay dessert and created a fusion version by adding many other ingredients and made it into a colourful dish. They called it pengat without any suffix. It is also a must have dessert for Malaysian Penang Nyonyas during Chap Goh Mei, which is the fifteen day of Chinese New Year. The ingredients used are bananas, yam/ taro and sweet potatoes/ kumara.

Meanwhile, bubur cha cha is consider a cousin to pengat. One can easily differentiate a pengat and a bubur cha cha based on the ingredients used. Traditionally, the ingredients used in bubur cha cha includes black eyed beans, colourful boiled starch, sago, yam/ taro and sweet potatoes/ kumara. However, the commonly available version now only consists of yam/ taro, sweet potatoes/ kumara and colourful boiled starch. No banana is used in making bubur cha cha. The liquid consistency for pengat is thicker compared to bubur cha cha though some may prefer a thinner version. Lastly, pengat is traditionally cooked with gula melaka, instead of using sugar. With these knowledge in hand, you can now easily differentiate a pengat and bubur cha cha at anytime and anywhere.

While the purple kumara is still in the season here, I thought I better make some pengat. I like to add the purple kumara into it to make a multicoloured and attractive pengat. So here’s my recipe below for your reference.

 

All photos, videos and recipes on CoasterKitchen are copyright protected. Please do not use the photos, videos and recipes without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own words (instead of copy and paste) and link back to my blog. Thank you very much!

 

INGREDIENTS 
(Serves 6 – 8)

250g fresh yam/ taro
250g fresh brown/ orange kumara (sweet potatoes)
250g fresh purple kumara (sweet potatoes)
250g fresh golden kumara (sweet potatoes)

250ml thick coconut milk
1 litres water
3 tbsp rock sugar
5 – 10 pandan leaves, knotted

3 pcs bananas
250ml water
2 – 3 tbsp rock sugar/ 50g gula Melaka

1. In a pot, add in 2 – 3 tbsp rock sugar/ 50g gula melaka and 250ml water. Bring the mixtures to boil and until all the rock sugar/ gula melaka has dissolves.

2. Cut the banana diagonally, about 1cm thick.

3. Once the rock sugar/ gula melaka has dissolves, add the cut bananas into the mixtures. Simmered for 1 minutes on medium heat and set aside to cool. Allow the bananas to soak in the sugar syrup for at least 1 hour before serving.

*Make sure all the bananas are submerged in the sugar syrup.

4. Cut all the taro and kumara into similar cubes sizes. Place cut taro and kumara into a steaming plate individually.

5.  Bring water to boil in a steamer. Steam the taro and kumara individually until cooked. Set aside to cool.

*Make sure you steam each types of kumara and yam separately as their cooking times are different. 
*It is cooked when it is soft when you push a bamboo sticks in the cubes.

6. In another big pot, add in 1 litres water, knotted pandan leaves and 3 tbsp rock sugar. Bring the mixtures to boil on high heat for about 5 minutes or until all the sugar has dissolves.

7. Then add in the coconut milk and bring it to boil.

8. Then add in all the steamed taro and kumara to the pot. Simmered for about 4 – 5 minutes.

9.  Serve in individual bowl, and add in some boiled bananas in the bowl just before serving.

Pengat Recipe

  • Servings: 6 - 8
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Credit: CoasterKitchen

All photos and recipes on CoasterKitchen are copyright protected. Please do not use the photos and recipes without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own words (instead of copy and paste) and link back to my blog. Thank you very much!

Ingredients

  • 250g fresh yam/ taro
  • 250g fresh brown/ orange kumara (sweet potatoes)
  • 250g fresh purple kumara (sweet potatoes)
  • 250g fresh golden kumara (sweet potatoes)
  • 250ml thick coconut milk
  • 1 litres water
  • 3 tbsp rock sugar
  • 5 – 10 pandan leaves, knotted
  • 3 pcs bananas
  • 250ml water
  • 2 – 3 tbsp rock sugar/ 50g gula Melaka

Directions

  1. In a pot, add in 2 – 3 tbsp rock sugar/ 50g gula melaka and 250ml water. Bring the mixtures to boil and until all the rock sugar/ gula melaka has dissolves.
  2. Cut the banana diagonally, about 1cm thick.
  3. Once the rock sugar/ gula melaka has dissolves, add the cut bananas into the mixtures. Simmered for 1 minutes on medium heat and set aside to cool. Allow the bananas to soak in the sugar syrup for at least 1 hour before serving.
  4. Cut all the taro and kumara into similar cubes sizes. Place cut taro and kumara into a steaming plate individually.
  5.  Bring water to boil in a steamer. Steam the taro and kumara individually until cooked. Set aside to cool.
  6. In another big pot, add in 1 litres water, knotted pandan leaves and 3 tbsp rock sugar. Bring the mixtures to boil on high heat for about 5 minutes or until all the sugar has dissolves.
  7. Then add in the coconut milk and bring it to boil.
  8. Then add in all the steamed taro and kumara to the pot. Simmered for about 4 – 5 minutes.
  9.  Serve in individual bowl, and add in some boiled bananas in the bowl just before serving.

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