Mee Suah Soup Recipe

It is always nice to have comforting food after a long and tiring day. What is your type of comfort food? Mee suah soup (面线汤) is a kind of comfort food for me, especially during the winter days where nothing beats a hot bowl of noodles soup to keep my body warm.

Mee suah soup, a comforting food after a long and tiring day

Mee suah (面线), as the Hokkien will call it, originated from Fujian province of China, and are made from wheat starch. It is commonly known by the Hokkien/ Chinese communities as one of the longevity noodles. Meanwhile, the Cantonese usually associates it with egg noodles or better known as yee foo noodles as their longevity noodles. 

Mee suah is usually being served during birthday celebrations either in the restaurants or at home. In some Chinese households in Malaysia/ Singapore, the parents (especially mum), will definitely cook mee suah soup for their kids during their birthday and served together with red dyed eggs. And since this noodles is to signify longevity a.k.a long life, it is always been advised not to cut the noodles and just slurp the whole noodles while eating it since the olden days. 

Mee suah soup, is also sometimes being served to someone who is unwell. Since the noodles are made from wheat starch, the noodles becomes soft after cooked which makes it easier to chew and digest for an unwell person. Therefore, almost everyone will have tried and tasted mee suah soup at some point of their life.

In my opinion, the best soup stocks that matches the mee suah flavour perfectly is the dried anchovies stock. However, I know some people may not like dried anchovies stocks due to the flavour/ health reasons. Therefore, feel free to change it to your preferred stock. 

One important note for this recipe is that the noodles will becomes soggy and mushy if it is being cooked for a long time. Therefore, it is always advisable to cook only when you are ready to eat, and served it immediately once cooked. Unless you don’t mind the soggy and mushy textures, you can cooked it ahead before meal time. Lastly, there is no hard and fast rules on what you can/ cannot add into this noodles soup. So, feel free to add in whatever that you like into your bowl of mee suah soup.

All photos, videos and recipes on CoasterKitchen are copyright protected. Please do not use the photos, videos and recipes without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own words (instead of copy and paste) and link back to my blog. Thank you very much!

Ingredients
(Serves 2)

50g dried anchovies
1.5 litres water
1 tsp Tian Jin preserved cabbage (冬菜)
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste

100g pork mince/ slices
1 tsp sesame oil
1 tsp light soy sauce
1 tsp corn starch
1 tsp Chinese shao xing rice wine
1/2 tsp salt
Dash of pepper

2 bundles mee suah/ longevity noodles
2 hard boiled egg
Bok choy (小白菜) / choy sum (菜心)
Crispy pork lards
Crispy shallots


1. Marinate the pork with sesame oil, light soy sauce, corn starch, shao xing wine, salt and pepper. Set aside to marinate for at least 10 minutes.

2. To make the soup base, rinse through the anchovies with water. 

3. Then add water and anchovies into a pot. Bring the water to boil on high heat for 5 minutes. Then lower the heat, and continue to simmer for 1 hour. 

*If you want to make quick soup base, you can use anchovies cubes too.


4. Remove the anchovies from the soup stock. Then add in Tian Jin preserved cabbage into the soup and bring it to boil for another 5 minutes. 

5. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

6. Add in the marinated minced pork little bit at a time. Continue to cook until all the pork are totally cooked.

7. Add in the green vegetables and mee suah into the pot. Use a chopsticks to loosen the noodles. 

*If you want to add other additional ingredients such as fish balls, add them in at this stage too. 

*Or else, you can separately blanched the vegetables and top it up just before serving.

8. Continue to boil the soup for another 2 – 3 minutes. Then serve immediately. 

9. Garnish the bowl of noodles with some pepper, hard boiled egg, crispy pork lards and crispy shallots.

Mee Suah Soup Recipe (面线汤)

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Credit: CoasterKitchen

All photos and recipes on CoasterKitchen are copyright protected. Please do not use the photos and recipes without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own words (instead of copy and paste) and link back to my blog. Thank you very much!

Ingredients

  • 50g dried anchovies
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 1 tsp Tian Jin preserved cabbage (冬菜)
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 100g pork mince/ slices
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tsp corn starch
  • 1 tsp Chinese shao xing rice wine
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • Dash of pepper
  • 2 bundles mee suah/ longevity noodles
  • 2 hard boiled egg
  • Bok choy (小白菜) / choy sum (菜心)
  • Crispy pork lards
  • Crispy shallots

Directions

  1. Marinate the pork with sesame oil, light soy sauce, corn starch, shao xing wine, salt and pepper. Set aside to marinate for at least 10 minutes.
  2. To make the soup base, rinse through the anchovies with water.
  3. Then add water and anchovies into a pot. Bring the water to boil on high heat for 5 minutes. Then lower the heat, and continue to simmer for 1 hour.
  4. Remove the anchovies from the soup stock. Then add in Tian Jin preserved cabbage into the soup and bring it to boil for another 5 minutes.
  5. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Add in the marinated minced pork little bit at a time. Continue to cook until all the pork are totally cooked.
  7. Add in the green vegetables and mee suah into the pot. Use a chopsticks to loosen the noodles.
  8. Continue to boil the soup for another 2 – 3 minutes. Then serve immediately.
  9. Garnish the bowl of noodles with some pepper, hard boiled egg, crispy pork lards and crispy shallots.

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